Thursday, November 24, 2011

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Meet Hector Lopez, Quadruple Threat Artist



He dances, he acts, he draws, he paints on canvas, he paints on bodies, he's a photographer...ok, maybe quadruple threat was an understatement. A few weeks ago CAM published an article on Hector Lopez's Kim Kardashian Inspired Body Paint, which I still have people contacting me about! Now we're back with an interview on this amazing talent and more images of his work. Be sure to check out his bio after the photos at the end of this post!

Interview with Hector Lopez


CAM:  Have  you been active in art since childhood? What were the first types/genres of art that you engaged in?

Hector: Yes, I really first discovered my passion for art at around the age of 12. It started with just looking at books of Disney cartoons and copying what I saw. Soon after I moved on to comic books. I taught myself how to draw without copying from another page. I tend to challenge myself artistically. I remember always picking the hardest projects I could find in my art classes. At one point I went to the School of Visual Arts with aspirations of becoming a comic book artist. Comics, I would have to say, have been my biggest influence even to this day.



CAM: How did you evolve into the the types of art you create now? What (or who if relative) where your inspirations?

Hector: Well honestly, I have to say my first inspiration came from sibling rivalry. It's so funny, but I first picked up a pencil to draw because my younger brother told me I couldn't do something he did. To an older brother that is a challenge that cannot go unanswered. Of course I can't go without mentioning my mother, who not only supported my art, but was the best critic I could have. She was always honest on whether or not one of my pieces was up to the standards of my previous works. Anyone who knows me knows that I appreciate true honesty. Currently, I find inspiration from the other artistic people I have come to know who help me improve my craft. This includes 2 of my uncles that have been in the field of photography for many years and new friends whose work I admire and absolutely respect.
Relatively I am pretty new to many aspects of the art I am creating now. My art currently has many different outlets. I am still illustrating and painting, but I have to say I find immense satisfaction in the art work revolving around photography. I include my body painting in this as I mainly photograph my own work. 


Now, you asked how it evolved. Well, it started with me wanting to do something outside of the comic book drawings. I decided I wanted to paint again, but, I wanted to paint people. I was asked by a friend if I would make a nude painting of her. I agreed. I took some photos of her to work off of so she wouldn't have to sit for hours on end. With that painting done, others started to approach me to do a painting for them. With each painting came more photos. Noticing that I liked how many of the photos were coming out I started becoming more interested in photography. At this time I was also introduced to Photoshop, which I was only using for my illustrations at the time. I started to learn how to edit photos and apply some of the interesting techniques I learned from illustrating. Shortly after that I was approached to try my hand at body paint.  I said yes. I loved it.



CAM:  What inspired you to start body painting (if any, aside from the above mentioned approach)? Can you describe your own personal learning process? 

Hector:  I always had an interest in this art form. Like most of my art, I am self taught. I spent the first year and a half to two years discovering and researching what paints to use and finding models interested in being painted. It was a bit of a slow process at first. Finding models wasn't easy. Once I started to create more and more pieces it became easier to find models, meaning I could learn the proper paints and applications faster. Now, a little past my 3rd year since I first tried it, I feel confident in my ability to create interesting pieces and I am continuing to learn and build on that.


CAM: I have a few questions sent to me from reader's of the article about the Kim Kardashian inspired project. 
CAM Reader: What was the longest body painting project?

Hector:  Well during the early learning stages pieces took a lot longer than they do now. I can probably say the longest piece was at the very beginning when I painted 6 women for a shoot promoting their rendition of the Vagina Monologues. Though I tried to keep the designs simple and they were only partially painted , it took around 12 hours to complete. Now I wouldn't attempt more than 3 women without an assistant.



CAM Reader: What does he do to focus on really Long pieces?

Hector: It doesn't matter how long a piece takes to finish. Creating a finished piece and seeing the model's reaction keeps my focus til it's done. I also tend to take breaks and let the model see the progress. This helps to also keep them excited and eager to see the finished product. I also tend to try to engage the models in conversation so they can get more comfortable and the time passes more quickly for the both of us.



CAM Reader: Does he prefer to work in silence or does he listen to music while painting to draw inspiration?

I do like to have music in the background, but, I don't always have it on. It really depends on the model. It seems I use music less when I am really familiar with the model. Either way I always give the choice of music to the model as my taste is broad. If the model doesn't have a preference I prefer a more rock style. Groups like Red and Linkin' Park with a mix of groups like Sublime.
Body Paint Artist









  Photographer







Painter

And much more, but this isn't a book, it's an article. ;)
For more of Hector, you can become a fan on Facebook here-->Heloz Art & Photography<--and you can visit his website here<--and make sure to check out the promo Hector has running exclusive to his Facebook Fans!


Please read Hector Lopez's Biography below and thank you for reading! <3 CAM



Hector Lopez

Hector Lopez is a self taught artist who enjoys delving into various styles of art. Starting with cartooning and illustration and expanding into photography, photo manipulation, painting, and most recently body painting. Due to his vast range of interest, Hector is a hands on, do it yourself type of artist. In his childhood Hector took an interest in cartooning which cultivated a passion for the arts and led him to "The School Of Visual Arts". Although there for a short amount of time, he was immediately exposed to an array of artistic styles. He was introduced to sculpture, painting, photography, and a number of other things. After leaving SVA, his main focus for some time was what led him there - cartooning. In 1998 Hector took to another form of visual art; dancing, something he enjoys immensely til this day. In the past years that he has been dancing, Hector has been able to add teaching, performing and competing to his growing artistic resume. For some time, dancing was his focus but eventually and inevitably, Hector's first passion would take over and his pencils would take front stage over his dance shoes again. Just a few years ago, Hector picked up a paint brush again for the first time in years, making paintings of friends and creating a photographic portfolio of his models and his work. After finishing a number of paintings he discovered how much he enjoyed photography. Coincidentally it was around this same time he was introduced to Photoshop programs. Utilizing those Photoshop programs for his illustrations he eventually began applying those techniques to photographs. Hector, now an amateur artist with some experience under his belt, felt confident in embarking on a project he had wanted to do ever since he was a teen. Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition had done a series of body painted bikinis in the early nineties. Hector was amazed on how real the paint appeared. Around 2009, Hector was approached with a proposal to try his hand at this artistic style. Without formal training, Hector used the first year plus to train himself and find models who were interested. Today, Hector has grown his artistic portfolio with a number of beautiful, creative and unique body painting pieces. Hector is becoming confident in the potential of his work with each project. 


He is currently enrolled in the New York Institute of Photography to enhance his photographic skills and bring his artistry to the next level.



Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Hector Lopez’s Kim Kardashian Inspired Body Paint Art


A little over a year ago from today there was a big buzz about Kim Kardashian’s then up and coming cover for W Magazine, where she was supposed to be adorned in body paint art work. I, being both a fan of Kimmie K and Body Paint Art, was looking forward to seeing what the artist came up with for the Fabulous K. Well, when the cover was released, I couldn’t be any more disappointed when I saw that she was simply painted in silver. Her photos came out beautiful and she has a body that I would trade in all of my worldly possessions for, but I already knew that. Therefore, W Magazine wasn’t showing me anything new. Where was the art? Not God’s beautiful creation art, the body paint art?

I immediately contacted my friend Hector Lopez, who had been practicing body paint art for some time, and asked him if he had seen the photos. He had heard about them (I imagine I wasn’t the only one who text blasted him on the topic) and when I suggested he send photos of his work in response to the article, he humbly responded that perhaps the “art” was in the way that the artist created the paint; he didn’t know the details of that particular project, therefore he passed no judgment. So I just did it for him. To me there was no art beyond there being a beautiful woman in silver paint. In the name of art, I wanted him to share his photos with W Magazine. Kind of sort of in retaliation. Forgive me. 

Gorgeous, but where's the city sights artwork?
As time normally does as a service to us, the truth came out. Revealed only a few months later on “Kim and Kourtney Take NYC”, was a crying Kim at the sight of her published photos. “There was supposed to be art work!” she cried. Now I was really upset. Isn’t body paint art supposed to be painted on the body, not digitally placed? I am no expert, but I believe that this is a matter of common sense; I really mean no offense, but not one person in her huge supporting circle thought of this in the midst of the hectic Kardashian business? This all left me with additional disappointment; she was lied to, and I assume digital art was intended to be used to represent body paint art. Both being respectable and amazing forms of art, but still different forms of art. I sent Hector a text again. I wasn’t surprised when I found out that several other fans of his work beat me to him with their laments after seeing this episode of Kim and Kourtney Kardashian’s show. This time, Hector agreed to do a silver paint series and I hopped onto the LIRR in the brick cold to participate at his Brooklyn based home studio.

On a poor man’s budget (meaning only able to buy the paint used on Kim’s shoot and work with whatever available materials were left in the studio), we got to work. Hector decided on a NYC bridges theme and I chose to be the Queensboro Bridge. Hector went for a graffiti inspired style and I am amazed at how Hector can do so much with so little available.  Although I am very bashful about doing these kinds of projects, I really am so fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with Hector, he is among the most professional and talented people I know and he continues to evolve , grow and become even better as an artist. So, though I bashfully present to you the results of our collaboration, I also proudly present it to you because I believe in his work. In the name of and for my love of truth, art and Kim Kardashian, here it is! I feel that if Kimmie K ever decided to do a project like this again, she should insist on Hector Lopez doing the work, imagine what he can do with that budget.






Thanks for reading and look out for more work and an interview with Hector Lopez coming soon on CAM!

Make-up Artist: Lisa Reyes
Artist/Photographer: Hector Lopez
Artist/Photographer Contact: Website & Facebook

A special thanks to Daniela Baldor for proofreading various pieces of this article in the midst of her busy life!

For an example of some amazing digital art, check out my favorite guy Derek Santiago





Friday, October 28, 2011

Model Ashley LaCamp- Part I? I hope!

 


 Ashley LaCamp is a 19 year old model who hails from Fort Worth, TX. She has been a professional in the industry for four years, modeling in Dallas, New York and Los Angeles. Working with Page Parkes Managment in Dallas and Clicks Models in New York and LA, Ashely has modeled for various designers on the runway and for print. When Ashely is not in front of the camera, she spends her time playing the ukulele, barrel racing and riding horses. Ashley endeavors to pursue a degree in international business and travel the world.









Hello Everyone! Today I'd like to introduce you to the main model whose face has been gracing the web pages of CAM this week. As you've seen from her bio, Ashely LaCamp is only 19 years old, however, because of the way she carries herself and her professionalism, she had me fooled! On set we briefly discussed that it's the industry that makes one this way, and I imagine that in order to be taken seriously, well, then you must have to act more on the serious side. Through my own dabbling in modeling, I know that it's not all the glamour and simple work some think it to be. After watching Ashley at work, I have an even greater respect and understanding of all that is involved. I won't get into it too much now because I am hoping that Ashley will be interested in doing a follow up interview on the world of modeling soon. This interview is a great introduction to Ashley's world and how she got into the modeling industry. Enjoy!

Interview with Model Ashley LaCamp


What is it that inspired you to be a model? and/or Who encouraged and inspired you?

My dad was the one who started everything. I was really into rodeo when I started modeling, but my dad encouraged me to work harder for it (modeling).


Growing up, was this what you imagined you would be doing? What did you dream you'd be doing at this point of your life?

Growing up I wanted to own and manage a barn. I wanted to train horses and breed them. When I was younger modeling wasn’t even an idea in my head. I never really knew that much about it until my dad mentioned it to me.




I've heard some say that modeling is not an art. Do you agree or disagree? Why? If you disagree, please educate the audience on why it is an art. This is an argument I've had w a friend of mine for years, I will fill you in on the details later.

Modeling is definitely an art! Telling stories through pictures, conveying the designers image, and using models to show makeup/hair. Its all an art when you put it all together!




Your bio mentions that on your free time you like to play the ukele and go barrel racing. Can you tell those of us who do not know (eh hem) what they are?

The ukulele is like a small guitar, except it has four strings instead of six strings. A lot of people in Hawaii play them. I just randomly bought one last April and taught myself how to play on YouTube!

Barrel racing is a rodeo event. There are three barrels set up in a triangle in an arena and we run around the barrels as fast as we can in a cloverleaf pattern. Ive been doing that since I was seven and still do it when I'm in Texas!



Here are some of my favorite photos of Ashley, she is stunning!



The above photo is my favorite! It looks like it was taken in the 60's and 70's, and if you don't know by now from my other blogs, I love vintage!


Thank you so much for reading this series of articles of Circle of Art Movement and we hope to see you all again when it's time to present the next project. Below is Ashely LaCamp's contact information for serious professional inquiries only please and we'd be grateful if those who have a Facebook account would "like" Circle of Art Movement's fanpage.

*Sorry for the inconvenience (and what it does to the aesthetics of  this page, ugh!) but for some reason there is a large gap before Ashley's contact info that doesn't show up in my editing and I have not been able to eliminate. But as they say, the show must go on! ;)  Please scroll down.




















Twitter: @Ashley_LaCamp
Email: Ashley.LaCamp@gmail.com
Agencies: Page Parkes Management (Dallas) and Click Management (NY & LA)

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Wardrobe Stylist Scot Louie


BIO

Scot Louie was born Erik Scot Thompson. At the young age of 15 his alter ego  or “stage name” as he calls it surfaced. Scot is Erik’s middle name while Louie is his “alter ego”, and that’s how Scot Louie came about. Scot Louie has always been passionate about fashion and fashion design. Thinking fashion designing  was his career he has never quit but he soon realized design was not for him. Still knowing he had a keen eye for fashion/detail, a love for garments, trend and dreams of being amongst the elite in the industry Scot Louie branched out to styling. He immediately began working in the styling industry at 15. Through assisting and making connections, he landed a job with the infamous Danielle Staub of the Real Housewives of New Jersey which in turn gave him a lot of press. Scot Louie still has big dreams of being the next George Kotsiopoulos. Listen out for his name.





Hello again everyone! Today I'd like to introduce you to someone that I've come to call my "little brother from another mother". I still remember the day  that I applied to be his assistant stylist and how excited I was when he told me that he loved the material I sent and all I had to say about my views on my own personal fashion. Not long after, I sat in a state of awe when I discovered that he was only 18 years old and a senior in high school. Which was why he needed me (or an assistant stylist for that matter). Looking at his portfolio, his written material and his credentials, this was a difficult bite of information to swallow. His career had already began and he needed a right hand fashionista to start some projects during his school hours. Then, the adventure began and I discovered a world outside of my own closet, scouring NYC showrooms to find outfits for Danielle Staub and for Erika Hokanson's photo shoot. Scot must have taken a lot of breaks to the boys room to check out all the pics of the gorgeous pieces I found that day, and in the end he made some great outfits with the treasures I found. Now, just a freshman in college, Scottie continues to juggle his educational responsibilities and those of his dream career, and already has left an impression on the industry. I'm so honored to have Scot as a part of CAM and grateful that such a chock full of talent was introduced to me through him for my first blarticle series of Hattitude

Here is my interview with Scot Louie about what has inspired him to do what he does. I hope to see more of him on CAM down the line and share with you his growth on future interviews. Enjoy!


  Interview with Stylist Scot Louie, aka, "The Glaminator"

How long have you be into fashion?
I've been into fashion for a long time now. I began with fashion design at 11 and I soon realized it wasn't for me. I continued my research and began styling with my first gig off Craigslist in 2008. Immediately after, my career took off. It was a blessing in disguise. 

What inspired the path? 

My mother being very fashion forward inspired me to do all that I've ever wanted to do. 

Do you have any fashion idols and if so who?

Of course. Kim Kardashian, Rachel Zoe, Coco Chanel and Brad Goreski. They all have their own unique style. They break the barriers of fashion and re create classics in a whole new light.

What sets you apart from other stylists (not so much in a competitive aspect, but more like what makes you unique and different, what are your focuses in style?)

I believe all stylists are motivated by different things, some a paycheck and some public recognition. Those things are amazing and definitely things I want to achieve, but as a stylist I feel being so young and accomplishing so much makes me very unique. I also think my motivation makes me a unique stylist. As a sophomore in High School I was styling a reality show, attending red carpet events and working in the career field I wanted to be in years later. 

Of all of the projects you have worked on, which do you think reflects the style that you feel is most unique to you? I imagine that often times, when hired by an individual to style them, you must work to find a way to make them look good while catering to their individuality. Do you find that challenging in regards to wanting to remodel them into something/one new or do you look at it as a means of just enhancing who they are?

Well my clients usually have their own sense of style and as a stylist I feel it is my duty to polish and revamp the look of my clients. It's usually a slight battle but as a stylist you must know how to sell the look to your clients, and that is what keeps me going as a stylist. I love the challenge.

Still relative to the above question, would you mind discussing what you love most about styling in A) the above situation, for an individual as an image consultant needing to cater to their individual needs B)Working on your own projects, where you are free to do absolutely whatever you desire, with only your styling needs in mind? 
I do love working with models which allows me to create my own looks without the challenge. But I also love the challenge of styling my clients and persuading them to wear something they generally wouldn't. I like to see a finished look on my clients. Nothing makes me happier.

Now can you see why I enjoy working with this young talent? So young, so motivated, so inspiring. Scroll on down for pics of Scot Louie's work and contact information.

Adrienne Bailon
 



Ashley LaCamp, accessories all belong to Nifty Thrifty Stylist Closet

Danielle Staub, The Real New Jersey Housewives

Teen Queen Lea Robinson, Leggings by Dareyna Swan of Swarey Designs

Scot Louie
Wardrobe/Fashion Stylist
917-648-6814
www.ScotLouie.com

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Photographer Erika Hokanson

Erika Hokanson offering up knuckle sandwiches, any takers?

Early 2011 I had the pleasure of being asked to assist young celebrity stylist, Scot Louie, on a photo shoot with photographer Erika Hokanson in Brooklyn. Scottie and I referred to the photo shoot as "Numero" since the look Erika was aiming for was inspired by the Parisian fashion magazine Numero. It was an exciting and honorable adventure and I feel so fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with people as talented as Erika, Scot, Kimberly Caudle (MUA) and Ashley LaCamp (Model). One can learn a lot by watching Erika work. Her talent extends beyond being an amazing photographer; she has an incredible eye for the best hairstyles for each look, an incredible director with a ton of ideas for posing, always gives valuable input and last but not least, is so appreciative and thoughtful of her team (I will NEVER forget those amazing peanut butter cookies from Trader Joe's that Erika brought for us. They put Do-Si-Do's to shame). The honor is taken on my part to be able to work with and interview such a talented photographer this early on in my endeavors with the CAM project. Lucky me! Well, here she is folks, answering my questions in a beautifully written blarticle:



Fashion Photographer Erika Hokanson

Hello, my name is Erika Hokanson. I am a fashion photographer from California now working in Brooklyn. Thank you so much for the interview, I am honored to be a part of the CAM Project.
I have to start off by saying I really enjoy being a photographer. There are many aspects of my profession that I enjoy. The parts I most enjoy are creating a lighting scene or mood. I love the on set technical part as well as the collaboration among the team on a fashion shoot. All the creativity among the models, hair stylist, make up artist and wardrobe stylist is so inspiring. I love how much freedom you have in fashion. You have so much room for interpretation and room for great things to happen.
I got my start in photography pretty young. My father was a big inspiration. He used to have photos hanging in our garage from his classes in college. He would let me borrow his camera from time to time. I got hooked pretty quickly. I decided to get serious about photography and study at the Academy of Art in San Francisco. When I finished college I headed out east. I started working as an assistant to many fantastic photographers in New York. I learned a lot about the industry, lighting and what it takes to make a  living in the photography field.

These shots that I did with Scot and Lisa were inspired by a shot I saw in Numero Magazine. I was going for a sixties high contrast vibe.





Please visit Erika's website here-->CLICK ME!<--to check out more of her fabulous work and for contact info.


 Thank you for reading and please visit us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!


~CAM

Credits:
Photographer: Erika Hokanson
Model: Ashley LaCamp
Make-Up Artist: Kimberly Caudle
Stylist: Scot Louie
Assistant Stylist: Publisher

Wardrobe specifics will be available in the Hattitude and Erika Hokenson Album at Circle of Art Movement on Facebook by the first week of November.

Monday, October 24, 2011

Hattitude by Dorothy Winterman


The Hat Inspiration
Hello! This is Cantor Jessica Kettle here (my Steampunk name for this article, allowing me to be the singer I've always wanted to be!).
Back in March of this year, I had the honor of being asked by stylist Scot Louie to assist him in styling a photo shoot alongside a phenomenally talented crew. Of course I said yes, and he sent me photographer Erika Hokanson's style guide. Erika was going for a "60's contrast vibe" and the inspiration of this shoot came from a shot she had seen in the Parisian magazine Numero. This hat here to  the right was one of the looks in the given style guide. Where would I find a hat like that on such short notice?! Luckily, the guide arrived in my inbox not too long after a conversation with long time friend and new Steampunk hat designer, Dorothy Winterman, on how her designs would be awesome in editorial work. Soooo, who else better to recreate this look for Erika's photo shoot? I must also add as a side note that the same above conversation was a major factor in the inspiration of Circle of Art Movement. I decided a top hat version was the way to go for this look, and while Ms. Winterman got busy making our hat on such short notice, I got busy pulling wardrobe and accessories from my closet and NYC showrooms for Scot Louie to make fabulous outfits with. Below are some pictures of model Ashley LaCamp posing in the final creation followed by an interview with Dorothy Winterman herself, filling you in on what Steampunk genre is all about and about her fabulous line of hats and accessories. I am so impressed with the recreation of the hat from the style guide and how Hattitude made exactly what we were looking for while defying absolute imitation; creating an inspired look, not a copied look!



 Photos of Ashley LaCamp taken by Erika Hokanson. Stay "tuned" for their interviews and more photos of their work this week!

Above (L) Hat inspiration, veiled tilted saucer hat (R) Hattitude by Dorothy Winterman, veiled tilted top hat


Interview with Dorothy Winterman: 
  •   I know you as Luisa Fuentes. How and why did you choose the name Dorothy Winterman and what inspired the name of the line, "Hattitude"?
Okay so... here's the truth. I wanted a "Steampunk" name when I entered the genre as just a participant.  I went to Brassgoggles Steampunk Name Generator, or something like that, and was given the name: Dorothy Winterman.  So I went around introducing myself as that.  No one in the genre (at that time) knew my real name (just as we have stage names for belly dancing- I had one for this because one can NEVER be too careful).  As one of the few women of color in the scene I became known pretty easily- couple that with extensive cleveage and a lack of fear of showing it and my unique style of dress and accessorizing and Miss Dorothy Winterman became known more quickly and much more easily than I had EVER anticipated.
    At a Steampunk event in NYC in the fall of 2010, I decided to make my very own hat to wear along with the ensemble I had dreamed up.  Well...that hat got all the attention away from my cleavage (which became quite jealous I must say).  So many people asked where I bought the hat and I told them I had made it.  More than one person told me that they would buy hats like that from me if I sold them.  An idea was born. However, being that our little community is so...well...little, people knew me as Dorothy Winterman.  Explaining that my real name is Luisa Fuentes would have taken far too much time and effort and re-calibration (in fact many people still don't know my real name).  When I started making hats, bows, headbands and accessories, I tried to think of a name that would make it clear what my merchandise is and give the buyer some joy when they said it.  The name "Hattitude" came to mind for 3 reasons: 1- it describes me perfectly (attitude-with a hat); 2- it described my business and wares without sounding boring; 3- in some British dialects the sound of the "h" at the beginning of a word is not pronounced so the business name could be said (in an appropriate English accent) as "Attitude".  It was perfect and the rest- as they say- is history.
    • What exactly is Steampunk culture? Please describe a Steampunk event; it's music, style, activities that go on...
    Steampunk is a subculture of people, art, and style that uses victorian age aesthetics, clothing, and building materials and adds a modern twist of technology ideals and tolerance. Steampunks fall into 2 categories: those who role play and those who live it. Those who role play attend events and concerts in costumes. They put on accents and take on identities and occupations that may or may not mirror their daily lives. They can be neo victorians whose costumes are stunningly accurate to the time periods they prefer. Many of these steampunks focus on European dress and accents and prefer upper class clothing and speech. Then you have the day to day steampunks who still wear victorian inspired clothing to work and beyond. Men wear hats daily and tip them as a greeting. Polite, genteel conversation and interactions between people are expected. There is a kindness in the community. Even within the communities you have different groupings: you have people who make their own clothing or accessories and those who purchase clothing and accessories. One of the things that sets steampunks apart from other genres is the desire to create. Whether that is clothing or tesla coils or sonic disruptors, many steampunks LOVE to tinker in and with stuff. I started out buying outfit pieces and accessories. Now I make my own clothing, technical items and most accessories. It gives me a huge sense of pride in my accomplishments. There are steampunk houses like the Modvic House owned by Bruce and Melanie Rosenbaum, and mad scientists like Dr. Grymm and Michael Salerno. We have musicians like The Clockwork Dolls, Eli August and one of my favorite bands ever, Emperor Norton's Stationary Marching Band. The music is so diverse and eclectic that I'm not comfortable pointing to one person or group as THE steampunk musical example. We do have genre specific events and concerts as the culture expands and takes on new members. The Anachronism is an event that takes place every few months in Manhattan at Webster Hall. The next one takes place on December 4th. There are facebook pages specifically for steampunk events and announcements, and meet up groups for activities, art, and maker groups.

    • What are the price points of your hats?
    I price my hats on their sizes and the amount of embellishment that is on them.  
    The tiny hats (3 inches) go for $15 each - that's standard.
    Then I have 4" hats that start at $25 and go up to $45
    and 5" hats that start at $35 and go up to $55
    and 6 3/4 inch hats that start off at $45 and go up to $60
    and full sized male and female hats in small, medium and large that start at $75 and go up to $120






      • Do you custom make hats? If so what are your prices for that (or at least a starting price)?
      I can custom make hats- that depends on what you are looking for. I do not make buckram yet but mostly felt bowlers and top hats in a variety of sizes.  All my hats will be embellished and a person can chose the color of the felt they want along with colors for the embellishments and what type of embellishment (flowers, fake birds or fruit, ribbons, sequins).  Those start at $50 for a 5" hat because they are time consuming.
      I also make bows and headbands and embellished sunglasses and goggles.  Those can be found on my Etsy site.
      • How would one be able to contact you and check out your designs?
      I can be called:  (914) 439-0314
      Facebooked: Profile and Fan Page


      Thanks for reading folks and keep an eye out for interview posts on the rest of the crew throughout the week! To end this post off, after the credits, I leave you with another photo of this darling Hattitude creation in a photo taken by Paul Newland.

      Love,

      CAM

      Credits:
      Black & White photos of Ashley LaCamp
      Photographer: Erika Hokanson
      Stylist: Scot Louie
      Assisting Stylist: Publisher
      Make-Up Artist: Kimberly Caudle
      Model: Ashley LaCamp



       
      Photo by Paul Newland, Make-Up by Lisa Reyes